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Televsion in Our Lives - How Much is Enough?

By Heather Idoni

Added Thursday, February 24, 2011
==========================================================
Vol. 12 No. 13, February 24, 2011, ISSN: 1536-2035
==========================================================
© 2011, Heather Idoni - www.FamilyClassroom.net
==========================================================

Welcome to The Homeschooler's Notebook!

If you enjoy this newsletter, please recommend it to a friend! 

Not a subscriber? Get your own subscription to The Homeschooler's Notebook here:
http://www.familyclassroom.net

And please visit our sponsors -- they make our publication possible.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Greenville Homeschool Convention

Join Heather at the Greenville, South Carolina Homeschool Convention March 17th-19th!

BelovedBooks.com - Booth #1307-1309 - FREE Sugar Creek Gang CDs! :-)

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

=================
IN THIS ISSUE:
=================
Notes from Heather
-- Feedback and Questions
Helpful Tip
-- Local Science Fairs
Winning Website
-- The CIA World Factbook
Reader Question
-- Too Much Television?
Additional Notes
-- Newsletter Archives
-- Sponsorship Information
-- Reprint Information
-- Subscriber Information

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Cincinnati Homeschool Convention

Join Heather at the Cincinatti, Ohio Homeschool Convention March 31st-April 2nd!

BelovedBooks.com - Booth #302-304 - Just across from Math-U-See! :-)  -- See ya!

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

==================
Notes from Heather
==================

Reader Feedback -- Opinions on TV, Netflix, and More

---

Wow -- we had 20 moms write in about how their families make decisions about screen time, especially "commercial" TV. Very interesting reading!

My husband and I decided, when we first got married, to experiment with *not* owning a TV. We found we were very happy without one, and I know being TV -- (and even video/movie) free those first years had a huge impact on our boys' early lives. It is a different story now. Even though we never got a regular TV, we started watching videos about 10 years ago. And now the several computers in our home have made it harder to turn the tide.

Be sure to read all the great answers to the question of "Television in Our Lives" below in our Reader Question segment.

Enjoy the Notebook!

-- Heather

---

'Thank You' from Becky - Question was "Too Late to Change?"

"Dear Heather,
I had to send out abundant thanks to everyone who sent in answers to my question. Each answer encouraged and confirmed the way we are to take in our schooling. Thank you to each and every one." -- Becky

---

Questions for Upcoming High School Issue - Please Help!

"My oldest will be graduating this spring. He has only been homeschooled for his junior and senior years. His dad and I would like to see him participate in the statewide homeschool graduation, but he is dead set against it. His reasons are just excuses, meaning they are silly and really make no sense. I don't want to require him to do it with this attitude because I know it will just make us all miserable. My question is what have your kids done to mark this special day in their lives? Thanks for any suggestions." -- Lacey

---

"I am about to graduate my oldest child at the end of this school year, and I have been planning and thinking about how we want to celebrate this milestone. I would love to hear from other parents who have graduated one or more of their children about how they chose to celebrate this event. Thank you!" -- Mindy

---

Getting a Teen to Write

"I am wondering, how can I convince my 16 year old 10th grader that he really needs to write. He absolutely despises writing and it is a struggle to get him to write anything. I try letting him pick his own topic, assign him a topic, write a paragraph about his dog... anything. And I always get the bare minimum. My evaluator has tried to encourage him and I have threatened to make him move in with their family and let her homeschool him! LOL. He likes to work with his hands and doesn't mind reading, but when it comes to writing... ugh! I have tried several different writing curriculums that break the process down into tiny writing steps... nothing. How truly important is it for him to write a paper? He does excellent in the grammar department and he likes to read. He doesn't understand why he needs to even take English when he already speaks it. Isn't he funny?!

I truly am at the point where I just want him to be done with school and have even considered the GED. He does well in all of his subjects, but he just wants to be done and go to work. He already works at his uncle's garage repairing vehicles which we do count as something like tech school. What do you all think?? Is writing a paper that important? Thanks for any help." -- Andrea

---

Latin in High School - Or a More Practical Foreign Language?

"I am considering Classical Conversations for my oldest son for his high school years. One of the main courses offered is Latin. I am wondering what experiences others have had with their children learning Latin. I'm not sure I'm sold on it. It seems that focusing on Spanish for three years or more would be more useful and practical. I understand that Latin is supposed to help with the Reading portion of the SAT, however, wouldn't a vocabulary course which focuses on Greek and Latin roots do the same?? I'd appreciate any feedback, positive or negative regarding learning Latin in high school." -- Michelle in Virginia

---

Lacey, Mindy, Andrea and Michelle would all appreciate some high school help from our readers!

Please send your email(s) to hn-answers@familyclassroom.net.

(Your answers will appear in our next special High School Edition on March 7th.)

---

Your feedback is always welcome! -- mailto:heather@familyclassroom.net

==========
Helpful Tip
==========

Finding Local Science Fairs

"Heather, if families enjoy the 'virtual science fair' with Google, they can
go the next step and identify regional science fairs in their areas to add
2011-2012 live involvement. Wonderful way to access mentors, find career
role models in engineering, math and the sciences, and strengthen resumes
for college/apprenticeship applications.

http://apps.societyforscience.org/find_a_fair/

And as you know, we pitch Science Buddies all the time at the Ying TRSEF.
Perfect get-started tool for the Google Virtual Fair!"

-- Mary Eileen Wood, http://www.YingTRSEF.org
Dr. Nelson Ying Tri Region Science and Engineering Fair
604 Walberta Road, Syracuse NY 13219

===============
Winning Website
===============

The CIA's World Factbook - https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/

 "The World Factbook provides information on the history, people, government, economy, geography, communications, transportation, military, and transnational issues for 266 world entities. Our Reference tab includes: maps of the major world regions, as well as Flags of the World, a Physical Map of the World, a Political Map of the World, and a Standard Time Zones of the World map."

========================
Last Issue's Reader Question
========================

Television in Our Lives

"Hello, all -- My question stems from curiousity of what my fellow homeschoolers are doing in there homes about TV.   In the eyes of society, I will be 'new' to homeschooling because my daughter will be staying home with me next fall instead of going off to the brick and mortar for kindergarten.   However, after years of reading, I realized that we have been homeschooling all along since infancy.   I have a toddler as well.   And, I am curious about the rules exist in your homes regarding television.

In my house, we have never been big fans of TV.   Yes, we use it to view informational DVDs and other programs.   And, yes, sometimes my children watch 30 minutes to 1 hour of shows on PBS, but other than that we do not really watch a lot of TV.   Sometimes, my children are rewarded with a movie night where we watch a Disney movie - or something along those lines - together as a family.

There are a lot of negative effects that I have seen in my children stemming from staring at the TV.  Mainly, I felt disturbed by walking into the room and calling their names to be not answered and seeing the look of glazed eyes as they are lost in the sensory overload of the TV.   Also, in my heart, something makes me sad about a child sitting in a room and doing nothing but sitting and 'watching' for hours on end.   Both of these elements have caused me terrible conflict over the years as I contemplate simple requests of friends and family to just 'put in a movie for the kids'.   To me, that is not okay.

My family is very active to say the least.   As a parent, I have always made a point to be engaged with my children.   Because of the aforementioned I have been very conflicted about what little television we do watch.   Therefore, I am curious about what happens in your homes.   Perhaps I should not be so overly analytical about what little time we do spend watching it.   Perhaps, if the children are supervised and the programs are carefully selected, then the viewing of such programs are not as harmful as my subconscience is telling me and I should stop all my fretting.   I feel that reading your responses would put my mind at ease knowing what is going on out there in other homeschooling homes.   Am I making a mountain out of a mole hill?   Please weigh in." -- Jess

=====================
Our Readers' Responses
=====================

"Hi Jess --  For the last 12 weeks we have had virtually no television viewing in our home and it has made a HUGE difference. We made a deliberate choice to keep it turned off due to my son's (just turning 5) concentration -- or lack of it.  My 7 year old daughter has loved having no television and enforces it.  My husband has found it harder to adjust and has had to realize that he can't turn it on after the kids are in bed.  They didn't watch that much TV and it was all 'good' stuff - educational programs, Play School, or DVDs.  The way that TV programs and DVDs are made with images changing very quickly doesn't enhance concentration.

The changes we have noticed in the last 12 weeks are great.  Their imaginations have developed and they are making up stories and plays; they will sit and play together without fighting and without losing concentration; they will play outside a lot more; they are sleeping an extra half an hour each night (they have always been excellent sleepers and we didn't bargain on this positive effect); they read a lot more, and they can now sit through church and meetings without getting restless.  We are loving it.  They have had 2 occasions where they could each choose a DVD for a half an hour each to watch and they loved that.  I have noticed that earlier on I had to be creative in distracting them mid afternoon where I would normally let them watch TV, but that isn't an issue anymore.  Friends and family either think we are weird or express the wish that they could do the same but their husbands wouldn't follow through with it." --  Jane in Australia

---

"We do not have one -- we dont watch it.   We have a computer and can download movies and such, but I have to set limits espically with the 4 year old!   What is offered on TV is not giving my kids what they need to grow into warm ,loving, realistic, educated adults.   My kids may watch it when they go for their weekend visit at their Dad's... but I have noticed that when they come home it is very hard to switch back to learning mode.  This is not necessarly becasue they watched something 'bad', but because they were entertained all weekend and their minds were not used.  I try to guide them to other options for entertainment -- like bird watching (as corny as it sounds), for example.  Sometimes it works, sometimes not -- but at least they have that option."

---

"Dear Jess -- I am a homeschooling mom with seven children, (the youngest is still a toddler).   I too have allowed very little TV in my house -- and that includes pre-approved videos.   My children watch little TV or not any in any given week.   The reason is I find that not only do they get that 'mindless' stare you mentioned, but after a show goes off they are wild.   It's like something affected their brains.   They have a tendency to run around, talking quickly and often end up fighting with each other.   When no TV has been watched in a while, they tend to be more calm and even. (Not to say they don't fight at times -- they are kids!)  We provide our children with books -- lots of books.   We try to find their interests and then get the appropriate books to fuel those interests. They spend hours each day poring over a book.   They also have building sets of different kinds to help them work out their ideas and imaginations.   I have always believed that the simpler toys (ones without the electronic noises) were best for a child to develop his/her creativity and imagination.   That includes the TV.   Judging from my children's imaginative play and dreams for their futures, I'd say I was on track and I intend to stick with it.   Good luck!" --  Mary

---

"I think your heart is already telling you this, but you will be richly blessed to simply get rid of your television.   Neither my husband nor I grew up in a home with television, and we do not own one to this day.   We have 4 children, and we comment every now and then how we are so thankful that we don't have a TV in our home.   I don't believe you will ever regret getting rid of it.   Your 'terrible conflict' and 'fretting' will come to an end, and blessings will follow!" --  Bonny

---

"Hi Jess!   Personally, I feel that parents must do what is best for their own family regardless of what every other family is doing.   While it sounds as if you have a firm handle on TV viewing in your home, if you are experiencing uneasiness, then perhaps you are being led to adopt new guidelines for television viewing.  It has been my experience that whenever I become uncomfortable concerning something, it's time to make some adjustments and/or changes.   Hope this helps." --  Becky

---

"We finally ditched TV -- as in cable, satellite, etc., about 1-2 years ago.  It is such a blessing to be away from the advertisements!  That alone is worth so much!   We use Netflix now -- we pay $8.99 a month and get 1 DVD at a time in the mail and also unlimited 'streaming' over the internet. We have it set up through the PC, Wii and Xbox. We can choose wholesome shows and educational shows.  We have it set up to require a parental code so no watching TV without permission.  It's also easy to see all viewed items!   We also love requesting loads of videos from our library system.  Great for unit studies, etc.   We watch a show at night as a family and the kids get a little time on the weekends for 'fun' stuff (my son loves Mythbusters).  My 6 year old gets 1 hour a day for 'fun' videos.  We don't watch much more unless it's for learning -- we do love history, science, art, and how-to videos!"

---

"We probably watch less TV than some, and more than others.  I have one son with ADHD who cannot look away from the TV to do something that he really wants to do, like tell Dad goodbye in the morning.  He also has issues with shows that have lots of tension or suspense -- he cannot stay in the room and has to leave.   We do not have cable, and have no plans to get it.  (When we did have cable years ago, we discovered that PBS and a couple of other science related channels would have very similar shows -- to the point of asking each other if we had already seen the show.  I think that they are financed and produced together with slight changes.)   We watch only one network show -- the Simpsons -- which we watch with the kids and discuss issues with them. Other than that, we watch PBS.  The kids used to watch some every morning (when they were around 5 and less) but lately they don't even ask.  They know the shows are all ones they have seen and they would rather build with Legos or go outside.  It was nice that the little ones would watch while I worked with the older ones after nap times disappeared.  (Each kid had rest time up to 4, even if that meant looking at a book in bed.)  My kids are now 6 - 11.  In the evenings we watch NOVA, History Detectives and This Old House, among others.  I will let the kids watch some PBS while I am making dinner, but when it is light outside, they generally want to go outside.  I have also noticed a tendency as they learn to read, to get a book and read instead of asking to watch TV.   Both my husband and my families had a period of time when we were tweens when the TV broke and our families did not get another one for several years.  For me (and my husband), I did not care, as I loved to read.  It was very hard for my stepsister and stepbrother who were used to being entertained.  And that I think is one of the big issues I have with TV -- it takes away the ability to learn how to entertain oneself." -- Cheryl W.

---

"Jess -- My first response is this:  E very family is different, every child is different, and if you feel compelled to turn the TV off, then do so regardless of what others think!   That being said, I thought I'd share our experience.   We don't have TV reception where we live, so DVDs are our only option.  I have a 2 DVD per day limit for my daughter, and she generally has to do something before the DVD goes on -- I use it as a motivator of sorts.   I don't see the glazed eyes you're speaking of.   As a toddler, she learned her letters and numbers and colors and shapes with Barney et. al., and is now reading at a K level before 4 years old.   She's memorized songs after a couple of times of watching.   She knows Bible stories inside and out.  And, interestingly, DVDs have made a world of difference in our math, writing, and reading sessions -- we use curricula that includes DVD instruction (not part of our 2 DVD/day limit), and she JUMPS to do the worksheets afterwards.   She seems to thrive on the visual -- which may just be the type of learner she is." -- Jane M.

---

"Hi Jess -- I don't think you are making a big deal out of this issue.  We have not had a television in our home for years, long before we became homeschoolers.  If God has put a conviction on your heart please don't let popular opinion sway you." --  Melissa

---

"In our home we don't really have a TV at all.   We have a laptop and monitor set-up for when we do watch something.   I think the occassional instructional DVD/video is great.   There are just some things that you can't get across any other way.   The weekly family movie night with a pre-screened movie or two is also okay, especially if you discuss themes in the movie after.   When our kids are sick and parked on the couch, the rules are softer.   They can watch a movie or TV shows through Netflix -- usually something semi-educational (Blue's Clues, Cailou, etc.)  They don't watch commercial TV and m ost days it stays off.   Usually 30 minutes 2-3 times per week, plus maybe a movie each week, is the norm around here.   Our kids are 7, 5 and 3." -- Kelly B.

---

"Hey, Jess -- this is my 11th year of 'officially' homeschooling (yeah we pretty much homeschooled when the kids were too young for K, too).   I've met homeschoolers that don't own a TV, some that only watch prerecorded shows, and some that are more free with TV viewing.  There really is no 'right or wrong' amount of TV necessary for homeschooling.   It's simply an individual, personal matter.   Whether or not you change your TV habits is between you and your husband." -- MaryEllen

---

"We don't have a television in our home, however, we do have a DVD drive on our computer.   We have always treated watching DVDs as a privilege and not as a right.   We do allow our children to check out DVDs at the library and watch them, but they have to ask permission first.   I know a family who keeps their television in a wardrobe and locks the doors when it's not in use. That way the parents decide when the television is going to be available.   We encourage our children to find constructive ways to spend their free time -- playing outdoors, building things, art projects, looking at or reading books, etc..   We've spent time and money to help our children develop hobbies that they enjoy.   We also read aloud and play games with our children on a daily basis.   Sometimes our children feel a little left out because they don't know what the other kids are talking about in regard to celebrities and shows, but I don't necessarily consider that a negative thing." --  Jennifer G.

---

"We got rid of our television several years ago and have never regretted it.  I really believe there are more productive things to do rather than sit in front of a TV.   We live in a society where parents want the TV to babysit their children, thus unintentionally having the TV teaching values to the kids!   I will say that we do occasionally watch (as a family) The Waltons, Little House on the Prairie, Christy, etc. on YouTube (minus the commercials).  I think your children will be much better off without the TV.  Keep doing what you're doing!   It sounds like you are a mom who thinks of her children first!" --  Cindy

---

"In our household we watch a LOT of television.  However, I don't allow the television to be stuck on cartoons/'kids' shows all day long.  In my house, we watch television as part of our school day -- there are so many GOOD programs on channels like Discovery, NASA, Science, History, History International, The Military Channel, even Food Network and The Weather Channel.  We also (being a Catholic household) watch EWTN quite a bit.  Personally, I think the amount of television a household views depends on the QUALITY of the programs being viewed.  My children are very active.  They go outside for hours at a time to play.  When they're stuck inside due to weather, their imaginations are boundless and their 'Barbie stories' reflect quite a bit of what they've watched on television.  Even my 5 year old has used her toy soldiers to re-enact the Battle of the Bulge and Gettysburg.  My middle daughter (8) LOVES science and investigation shows, so they might use their cars to stage a car accident and she 'investigates' the cause of the wreck.  (My husband and I both have law enforcement backgrounds).   My eldest daughter also LOVES to watch RFD TV -- she's madly in love with the whole ranching lifestyle and horses are a major thing for her.  She watches shows on RFD to learn how to take care of and train horses, which is the career she's leaning toward right now.   As I said, it depends on what they're watching as to how 'good' or 'bad' all that television can be.   Hope this helps!" -- Kathrine

---

"Jess -- i n our home, with children the ages of yours, we watched very, very little television.   My older son napped, while my younger son would not -- so sometimes to provide a little 'quiet' time for the younger while the older slept, I'd allow the younger one (with me) to watch whatever children's show was on PBS.   Rarely had a problem with that.   Often, he'd enjoy reading books with me, playing play-doh or some fairly 'quiet' activity.   He needed his quiet time too, even if it wasn't sleep!   As a family, we don't watch television regularly.   There simply isn't enough on (even on History Channel or National Geographic!) to warrant the hours spent in front of it.   There's so much more to do and enjoy!   However, we do get DVDs from the library -- both movies and educational items -- which we enjoy on weekend nights.   After a long day outside, it's nice to sit together to watch something which we're learning about or enjoy as a family.   No, you're not strange!   Limiting screen time is critical, in my opinoin." --  Jennifer in Illinois

---

"In our home we look at what we want to spend our time on first.   We finish school and chores, then have at least an hour of outside play (weather permitting), then family responsibilities (things like going shopping with Mom).   Once all else is finished they can watch TV, play Wii or other video games, play with their toys, etc.  I find that if I have enough for them to do, their TV watching is naturally limited.   Mine are 9 and 8 and still have only PBS as their channel they can watch, mainly because we have an antenna and no cable or satellite, by choice.  They love the few shows they can catch, and probably average half an hour to an hour a day.   We also use Netflix for educational DVDs or streaming when I feel like we need it." -- Anne M.

---

"Jess -- I t sounds like you have already answered your own question when you said 'we have never been big fans of TV in our house'.  You don’t have to have one, just because 95% of the people do.   The only caution I make is that your husband should also be in support of having no TV as well.  Don’t make this a divisive issue in your marriage.   We have not had a TV in our home for over 5 years and we never looked back.  If you told me that we would be TV free 10 years earlier, I wouldn’t have believed it.   I never cared much about TV, but it was my husband's way to relax after work, and we both grew up with TV.  One night, we watched some movie or documentary, and my husband said, 'I can’t believe I just wasted an hour of my life watching that'. The next day, the TV went in the closet.   We put it on a rolling cart (which eventually collapsed, so we pulled it in and out of the closet as needed).   A few months later, watching much less TV, my husband commented that we had again wasted an evening on some movie.  The next day, the TV was at the curb for trash pick up.

We now have a computer with a fairly decent size monitor and w e watch movies on this, when we watch anything at all.   We subscribe to Netflix right now because there are several Christian movies we wanted to see.   When our list is depleted, we’ll cancel.   We have a small collection of acceptable movies at home or we rent them.   We get the news from conservative news sources on the web.   Actually, my husband screens the news and tells me the highlights, if there are any.   I don’t miss hearing 'the bad news' at all -- my world is much more peaceful since I stopped hearing about all the negative things around us.   If you asked my children if they miss TV, they would heartily say 'NO!'.   When we go on vacation, we do watch TV, and we are usually sick of it by the middle of the week.  I honestly don’t know how people get things done when they have a TV.   We keep busy all the time.   At night, we read aloud a lot (sometimes for hours), play games, catch up on projects, or just talk.   I would suggest talking to your husband and following his lead.   Tell him what is on your heart -- maybe he’s been having the same thoughts.   If not, you may plant a seed, and see results when he is ready." -- Jane

---

"Hi -- I'd like to give you my two cents for what it's worth.  My children are now 13 and 15.  Up until about 2 years ago, 'mainstream' TV was banned from our house.  Educational TV, particular movies that were age appropriate and DVDs were allowed.  Now, however, my 15 year old wants to be a film maker and my 13 year old is already a professional actor, so it is imperative that they get to know certain directors and actors.  What was always disturbing to me was most were the commercials, not necessarily the content of the show.  So we've gotten Netflix, and we can download programs and movies without the commercials that were so inappropriate.  I still review content of the shows themselves, but all in all it's been a great way for my daughters to view material that they need to see and study." --  Janet

---

"Hi Jess!   We are a family of 3 (daughter is 6 yrs old) and we watch a ton of TV.   We limit it to PBS, educational shows and Disney (although no Dumbo... too sad!).   We are very active as well but we all enjoy our TV 'down time'.   My daughter has learned so much from shows like Sesame Street, Super Why, Bill Nye and even telecourses broadcast from our local college.   That's the way she likes to learn things and I see no harm in letting her as long as it's supervised -- we have lots of other activities going on and the shows are positive.   That being said, always follow your instincts!   If you feel like unplugging, then by all means do so!   Don't worry about those who suggest to 'just throw in a movie' -- I don't agree with that either.   You know what's best for your family!   I hope that helps a little!   Happy homeschooling!" --  Traci

---

"We have 5 children ranging from 2 1/2 to 9 years, with one on the way. We have not had TV piped in since before my eldest was an infant. Our guidelines are about the same as yours, except we don’t have the outside programming in the home. But, we do the PBS thing at hotels or in homes we are visiting.

We have the same experience with people wanting to pop in a video or turn on some cartoons (with few exceptions, most of these are pretty gross) for the kids almost as soon as we walk in the front door. We believe people are genuinely trying to be hospitable. Now days, most kids are bored or unruly without something mesmerizing them to a screen. For the sake of considering the feelings of our hosts, we try to discern why they are asking. If it is appropriate, we will say, 'Oh, they are fine just visiting', or looking at these books, etc. If we feel our host really wants them to be confined to the television, we have learned to bring along a DVD we feel is appropriate, just in case (even at the grandparents’ house).

Never under any circumstances, do we feel it is necessary to allow them to watch something even slightly inappropriate (by our standards), even for the sake of diplomacy. That said, we do not believe that the TV is inherently sinful, just what we allow to come over the set and into our minds and the minds of our babes, and how much time we spend watching. We have found in raising our children without television (less than 1 1/2 hours a week on average), they do not know 'bored'.

 Also, even what most small children might consider boring in an educational documentary, ours consider a real treat and an occasion for popcorn! Blessings as you guard the influencers of your children. I read a quote somewhere that said, 'Whomever or whatever you allow your children to spend time with has at least that much influence over them'." -- Sarah

=========================
Answer our NEW Questions
=========================

"My daughter is in 6th grade and we both like Total Language Plus for her language program. However, it can get pretty intense going from one book to the next in this manner. What are some suggestions for us to use in between, where she will still be getting the full spectrum of language arts topics covered? Thanks!" -- Tricky

---

Would you like to offer Tricky some creative Language Arts suggestions?

Please send your email(s) to hn-answers@familyclassroom.net.

=====================
Ask YOUR Question
=====================

Do you have a question for our readers?

Send it to mailto:HN-questions@familyclassroom.net and we'll answer it in an upcoming issue!

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